• Science

    Science, not speculation, is essential to determine how SARS-CoV-2 reached humans

    On Feb 19, 2020, we, a group of physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, virologists, biologists, ecologists, and public health experts from around the world, joined together to express solidarity with our professional colleagues in China. 1 Calisher C Carroll D Colwell R et al. Statement in support of the scientists, public health professionals, and medical professionals of China combatting COVID-19. Unsubstantiated allegations were being raised about the source of the COVID-19 outbreak and the integrity of our peers who were diligently working to learn more about the newly recognised virus, SARS-CoV-2, while struggling to care for the many patients admitted to hospital with severe illness in Wuhan and elsewhere in China. It…

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  • Science

    These ‘creativity genes’ allowed humans to take over the world

    Creativity could be one of the main reasons Homo sapiens survived and dominated over related species such as Neanderthals and chimpanzees, according to a new study.  The idea that creativity may have given Homo sapiens a survival edge over Neanderthals has been around a long time, said senior author Dr. Claude Robert Cloninger, a professor emeritus in the psychiatry and genetics departments at Washington University in St. Louis. But that’s a tricky case to prove, as we still don’t know how creative Neanderthals actually were, he said.  “The problem with evaluating creativity in extinct species is, of course, you can’t talk to them,” Cloninger told Live Science. So an international…

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  • Science

    Newborn megalodon sharks were larger than most adult humans

    “Baby shark” has taken on a whole new meaning. Newborn megalodon sharks were supersized fish larger than most adult humans, a new study suggests. An analysis of the growth rates of the ancient ocean predators, which lived between about 23 million and 2.5 million years ago, estimates that the sharks started life at about 2 meters long, researchers report January 11 in Historical Biology. Otodus megalodon is right up there with Tyrannosaurus rex in the pantheon of scary extinct predators, but little is actually known about the shark’s biology (SN: 8/10/18). Its skeleton was made of difficult-to-fossilize cartilage, so what scientists do know mostly comes from fossilized teeth. For example,…

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  • Jobs

    20 jobs humans might lose to robots

    20 jobs humans might lose to robots 20 jobs humans might lose to robots Technology is moving rapidly, replacing humans with robots, artificial intelligence and automated technological solutions. It’s set to displace millions of workers as it makes their roles redundant. Is your career safe? Here are 20 jobs that humans might lose to robots. Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article. Truck drivers Trucks ensure that food makes it to your grocery stores, gas is available at the station and consumer goods are available for…

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  • Science

    Early humans may have survived the harsh winters by hibernating | Science

    Bears do it. Bats do it. Even European hedgehogs do it. And now it turns out that early human beings may also have been at it. They hibernated, according to fossil experts. Evidence from bones found at one of the world’s most important fossil sites suggests that our hominid predecessors may have dealt with extreme cold hundreds of thousands of years ago by sleeping through the winter. The scientists argue that lesions and other signs of damage in fossilised bones of early humans are the same as those left in the bones of other animals that hibernate. These suggest that our predecessors coped with the ferocious winters at that time…

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  • Science

    Bonobos, much like humans, show commitment to completing a joint task

    Bonobos display responsibility toward grooming partners akin to that of people working together on a task, a new study suggests. Until now, investigations have shown only that humans can work jointly toward a common goal presumed to require back-and-forth exchanges and an appreciation of being obligated to a partner (SN: 10/5/09). Primate biologist Raphaela Heesen of Durham University in England and colleagues studied 15 of the endangered great apes at a French zoological park. The researchers interrupted 85 instances of social grooming, in which one ape cleaned another’s fur, and 26 instances of self-grooming or solitary play. Interruptions consisted either of a keeper calling one bonobo in a grooming pair…

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