Camps return for South Platte River Environmental Education (SPREE) Program

Editor’s Note: ‘Our Colorado’ helps us all navigate the challenges related to growth while celebrating life in the state we love. To comment on this or other Our Colorado stories, email us at [email protected] See more ‘Our Colorado’ stories here. DENVER – This spring, the South Platte River Environmental Education […]

Editor’s Note: ‘Our Colorado’ helps us all navigate the challenges related to growth while celebrating life in the state we love. To comment on this or other Our Colorado stories, email us at [email protected] See more ‘Our Colorado’ stories here.

DENVER – This spring, the South Platte River Environmental Education Program, or SPREE, will begin offering summer camps and spring excursions again.

SPREE, which is a part of the Greenway Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to environmental education, canceled in-person camps and excursions last year due to the pandemic.

The Greenway Foundation’s Executive Director, Jeff Shoemaker, told Denver7 they are excited to welcome kids back.

“To a certain extent, with certain numbers, we will be able to bring children back to the river this spring semester, hopefully starting in March,” said Shoemaker.

By summer, Shoemaker told Denver7, SPREE plan to resume ten weeks of summer camps at its headquarters at Johnson-Habitat Park.

“We take children on learning sprees instead of shopping sprees,” said Shoemaker. “We’ve probably brought in 100,000 children over the years, from Pre-K through college through our River Ranger programs.”

However, Shoemaker said this year, capacities for camps and excursions are changing. Instead of the usual 30 kids per camp, there will likely be just 20 kids due to COVID-19 regulations.

Denver7 is committed to exploring the growth we are all experiencing in Our Colorado. We want to know what you’re seeing and what questions you have about what’s to come in your community. If you notice a new project and you want to know more, email us at [email protected] and ask, “What’s that?” Every week, we’ll take your questions and see what we can find out.

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