• Online School

    Adventist Review Online | Adventists in Russia Launch Online School

    September 13, 2021 Accredited institution is connecting students from across the Federation. By: West Russian Union Conference, Euro-Asia Division, and Adventist Review A new Christian online school organized by the Department of Education of the West Russian Union Conference (WRUC) of the Seventh-day Adventist Church opened its virtual doors on September 1, 2021.  The Istok school differs from traditional schools in that students never come to a building, and the school virtually comes to their home through computers and mobile devices. This type of training has its advantages: no need to waste time on the road, carry a heavy backpack, or be afraid of bad weather. The school consists of online classes…

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  • Education

    Parent PLUS borrowers stealing from their retirement to fund kids’ college education, survey says

    One in four American parents who borrowed from the federal government to help pay for a child’s college education doesn’t expect to retire as planned because of the debt, a survey released Tuesday says. And one in five parent borrowers regret taking out the loans, the NerdWallet survey shows. “Parents take on whatever it takes to get their kids at college, including taking on unaffordable debt,” said Anna Helhoski, student loan expert at NerdWallet, a personal finance website based in San Francisco. Of the total $1.6 trillion in student loan debt, Americans borrowed roughly $103 billion in PLUS loans as of the second quarter of 2021. There are 3.6 million…

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  • Home Schooling

    Homeschooling is better than traditional schooling

    By Danika Young | LTVN Reporter/ Anchor A significant portion of the American public views homeschooling as an old-fashioned and outdated way to educate today’s youth. However, homeschooling has become increasingly popular in recent years. It has increased steadily from 2% to 8% every year and is continuing to grow. In addition, there are many enticing qualities that homeschooling has to offer to make it superior to traditional schooling. Homeschooling allows parents to choose the curriculum and how they teach it. For example, my parents were firm believers in educational traveling; I was able to travel to many countries, where I learned about different cultures and gained real world experiences…

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  • Online School

    School And Online Learning Evolve Rapidly: Nerdy CEO Discusses Trends

    As some students get back to school amid a new wave of variants and ongoing anxiety, the future of school and how students will learn continues to evolve rapidly.   According to research I’ve been involved in during Covid as well as multiple reports I have reviewed from Barkley, Gen HQ & Pew Research, Gen-Z is likely more impacted by Covid than any other cohort. Older generations are certainly affected by Covid but many have completed education, started careers and often started families. In the case of Gen-Z they had their prom cancelled, their classroom opportunities modified, their social lives disrupted and even their parents are now using Tik Tok. That’s a true…

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  • Education

    Alabama education chief wants $800 million more for teachers and students in 2023 budget

    Want more state education news? Sign up for The Alabama Education Lab’s free, weekly newsletter, Ed Chat. Alabama education officials have big plans for the 2022-23 school year, judging by the more than $800 million increase they’ll request when the legislative session starts in January. “The amount of [state] money we think is going to be available this year is going to be phenomenal,” Alabama Superintendent Eric Mackey told board members during a presentation of the proposed ask. The education trust fund, which pays for schools, is expected to grow 16% year over year. The current fiscal year, which determines how much money lawmakers will have to distribute, ends Sept.…

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  • Home Schooling

    Public and private school teachers choose to homeschool own children

    Amanda Hoerschelman used to teach 75 children a day. As a 5th-grade public school teacher in Texas and Georgia, she had a revolving door of 10- and 11-year-olds. She loved teaching and her students but knew they weren’t getting the one-on-one attention they needed. Still, when Hoerschelman had her eldest daughter Ava, she didn’t think twice about sending her to a brick and mortar. That all changed when the family moved to Maquoketa, Iowa, with their 5-day-old daughter Autumn in tow. The plan was Hoerschelman would go back to teaching, but the family ran into trouble finding daycare so she decided to stay home and give her daughters the individualized…

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  • Online School

    Online coding school Treehouse, formerly based in Portland, lays off most of its staff

    Treehouse, which launched in Portland a decade ago in an ambitious effort to teach software development online, plans to lay off most of its staff by the end of the month. CEO Ryan Carson didn’t answer emailed questions about the cutbacks, but said in a brief reply Tuesday that “we are going to continue to serve our students and customers.” Carson, who moved to Connecticut last month, said Treehouse is no longer based in Portland and that its remaining staff now works remotely. In an announcement sent last week over the company’s internal Slack messaging channel, later viewed by The Oregonian/OregonLive, Treehouse notified employees that their jobs and benefits would…

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