• Education

    In dispute between D.C. and union, arbiter ruling clears city schools to reopen Monday

    Elizabeth Davis, president of the Washington Teachers’ Union, argued that there were numerous safety violations at schools — including HVAC systems that lacked proper documentation showing they were repaired — and that the city had failed to properly conduct walk-throughs. Based on the ruling, two schools — Coolidge High and Watkins Elementary — will probably have to delay their reopenings and schedule new walk-throughs. The arbiter said the walk-throughs at those schools were too brief and did not allow participants to view enough of the building. “The arbitrator’s decision makes it clear: all of our schools are safe and ready to reopen, and we look forward to welcoming back thousands…

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  • Education

    Proposal on strengthening education aimed at making boys more ‘masculine’ triggers debate

    Students in Foshan, Guangdong Province, play rope skipping after class. File Photo: VCG Chinese education authority has recently vowed to enhance physical education and psychological direction in a response to a previous proposal from a top policy advisor calling on the country to strengthen “masculinity” education for boys, which has ignited heated debate on the internet.  The proposal has won some support, while many on the internet believe it might lead to gender stereotyping. Experts noted that the goals of education should be to train students to be more responsible, and called for a more tolerant and diversified evaluation system for children. In a Thursday reply to the proposal on “avoiding…

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  • Jobs

    What to know in the week ahead

    As investors continue to digest last week’s Reddit-fueled volatility, they will also look this week to the regular cadence of quarterly earnings reports and economic data. Another couple of Big Tech earnings will punctuate the flow of quarterly results, with Alphabet (GOOGL, GOOG) and Amazon (AMZN) each set to report after market close on Tuesday. Facebook’s (FB) results last Wednesday offered a mixed picture of the internet advertising landscape against the ongoing pandemic. The company’s fourth-quarter advertising revenue handily topped estimates, though the company noted “significant uncertainty” remained over the trajectory of its ad business heading into 2021. While Facebook’s social media ad business is not a perfect analogy to…

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  • Science

    Lizard-like tuatara’s extra set of genes may help them tolerate cold

    The lizard-like tuatara already was an oddball. Its superpowers include a century-long lifespan, resistance to many diseases and a unique tolerance (for a reptile) to the cold. Now, it turns out, a part of the animal’s genetic instruction book is as weird as its life history — and may help explain its ability to withstand extreme temperatures. Tuatara have two distinct copies of the genetic instruction manual for making mitochondria, researchers report January 29 in Communications Biology. “It’s the first evidence of a full additional copy of the mitochondrial genome in a vertebrate,” says Chris Schneider, a herpetologist at Boston University not involved in the study.  Other vertebrates have only…

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  • Online School

    UK school principal plans to come out to pupils, staff during online assembly

    The principal of an exclusive private school plans to make history in the UK by coming out as gay during an online assembly. Nicholas Hewlett, the head of the $25,000-a-year St. Dunstan’s College in Catford, southeast London, told the Sunday Times of London that he plans to discuss his sexuality and marriage to another teacher during an assembly Monday. It is thought to be the first time a principal will come out in front of his pupils and staff in the UK, the paper said. PEOPLE WITH UK CORONAVIRUS VARIANT MORE LIKELY TO REPORT THESE SYMPTOMS: SURVEY Hewlett, 41, said he was inspired by a pupil who recently discussed how comfortable they…

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  • Jobs

    Former Trump officials find tough job market

    Corporate America is showing no signs of rushing to snatch up the vast majority of high-level Trump officials. Prominent figures from the Trump era were already facing tough job prospects at the end of 2020, but top U.S. companies have further distanced themselves from Republicans following the deadly mob attack on the Capitol earlier this month. Several ex-officials have secured employment at right-leaning think tanks and conservative organizations instead of landing plum jobs as corporate executives or board members, while others such as former White House economic adviser Larry KudlowLarry KudlowMORE are returning to their previous line of work on cable news. Experts say the range of employment opportunities for former…

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  • Science

    Federal Agencies Have Lost Hundreds of Scientists Since 2017. What Comes Next?

    By Taryn MacKinney First, the bad news: An analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists reveals that federal agencies like the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have lost hundreds of scientists since 2017. The good news: With the Biden administration already acting on its pledge to lead with science, a new day has dawned, and it’s time to get to work. Science Under Attack Since the birth of the National Academies of Sciences more than 150 years ago, US federal science has fueled many of the nation’s and the world’s great achievements. Federally funded scientists have mapped the human genome, created the World Wide Web,…

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